Wreck of the Abergavenny In February the Earl of Abergavenny set sail in convoy from Portsmouth for a voyage to India and China captained by John Wordsworth the younger brother of the poet William Wordsworth On board w

  • Title: Wreck of the Abergavenny
  • Author: Alethea Hayter
  • ISBN: 9780330491457
  • Page: 494
  • Format: Paperback
  • In February 1805 the Earl of Abergavenny set sail in convoy from Portsmouth for a voyage to India and China, captained by John Wordsworth, the younger brother of the poet William Wordsworth On board were than 400 passengers and crew Only three days later, separated from the convoy by stormy weather, the ship struck the notorious Shamble shoal in Weymouth bay and sanIn February 1805 the Earl of Abergavenny set sail in convoy from Portsmouth for a voyage to India and China, captained by John Wordsworth, the younger brother of the poet William Wordsworth On board were than 400 passengers and crew Only three days later, separated from the convoy by stormy weather, the ship struck the notorious Shamble shoal in Weymouth bay and sank, drowning 260 souls including her Captain From the harrowing accounts of the survivors and the detailed official and press reports if the disaster, The Wreck of the Abergavenny brilliant recreates this tragic event and its impact on John s brother William and his friends Coleridge, Charles and Mary Lamb, and many others Dramatic, haunting and engaging The Wreck of the Abergavenny is an intimate and beautifully observed view of a family and the effects of tragedy It is a masterpiece of narrative non fiction.

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      Posted by:Alethea Hayter
      Published :2019-09-17T01:27:51+00:00

    About “Alethea Hayter

    1. Alethea Hayter says:

      Hayter was the daughter of Sir William Goodenough Hayter, a legal adviser to the Egyptian government, and his wife, Alethea Slessor, daughter of a Hampshire rector Her brother, another Sir William Goodenough Hayter, went on to become British ambassador to the Soviet Union and Warden of New College, Oxford, while her sister Priscilla Napier was a biographer.Hayter spent her early years in Cairo, Egypt, in the years before the First World War, where the three Hayter children were well taught by a governess The children s lives changed dramatically when their father died, still in his fifties, and they returned to England in reduced circumstances Alethea Hayter was only twelve years old Her sister Priscilla later described their happy childhood in Cairo in her memoir A Late Beginner 1966 The three all won scholarships for their higher education Hayter was educated at Downe House School, in Berkshire, then under the headship of its founder Olive Willis, and at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she arrived in 1929 and went on to graduate BA in modern history Of her time at Oxford, Hayter later wrote We were conventional and innocent, though we considered ourselves pioneering and revolutionary not in politics, we were not much interested in them, but in our preferences in literature, the arts, social values In our Oxford days, none of us could have boiled a potato, let alone made a souffl , or would have known an azalea from a stinging nettle She never married.Following her years at Oxford, Hayter was on the editorial staff of Country Life until 1938 During the Second World War she worked in postal censorship in London, Gibraltar, Bermuda, and Trinidad.In 1945, she joined the British Council, and in 1952 was posted to Greece as an assistant Representative In 1960, she went to Paris as Deputy Representative and assistant cultural attach , and her apartment on the le Saint Louis became a meeting place for writers and artists Her last British Council posting was as Representative to Belgium, and she retired in 1971.She was a member of the governing bodies of the Old Vic and the Sadler s Wells Theatre and of the management committee of the Society of Authors.



    2 thoughts on “Wreck of the Abergavenny

    1. I found this on a second-hand shelf (see Blog! judithjohnson/blog/a). Sorry, late Cousin Alethea, but have to confess I found it less of a good read than the reviews by Andrew Motion, Julian Barnes etc led me to believe I'll be releasing this one into the wild at the local Pepenbury charity shop!

    2. Well written and easy to read. An enjoyable read as it looked into the effect of the wreck on John Wordsworth's family as well as the wreck itself and analysed how it impacted William Wordsworth's poetry. Definately recommended for those who like history but find historical accounts dry. My only criticism would be that the story wasn't written in chronological order and tended to jump around a bit, but that's more to my personal preference than anything.

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