The Battle of Blair Mountain The Story of America s Largest Labor Uprising In some West Virginia coal miners outraged over years of brutality and exploitation picked up their Winchesters and marched against their tormentors the powerful mine owners who ruled th

  • Title: The Battle of Blair Mountain: The Story of America's Largest Labor Uprising
  • Author: Robert Shogan
  • ISBN: 9780465077731
  • Page: 119
  • Format: Paperback
  • In 1921, some 10,000 West Virginia coal miners outraged over years of brutality and exploitation picked up their Winchesters and marched against their tormentors, the powerful mine owners who ruled their corrupt state For ten days the miners fought a pitched battle against an opposing legion of deputies, state police, and makeshift militia Only the intervention of aIn 1921, some 10,000 West Virginia coal miners outraged over years of brutality and exploitation picked up their Winchesters and marched against their tormentors, the powerful mine owners who ruled their corrupt state For ten days the miners fought a pitched battle against an opposing legion of deputies, state police, and makeshift militia Only the intervention of a Federal expeditionary force ended this undeclared war In The Battle of Blair Mountain, Robert Shogan shows this long neglected slice of American history to be a saga of the conflicting political, economic, and cultural forces that shaped the power structure of twentieth century America.

    • ☆ The Battle of Blair Mountain: The Story of America's Largest Labor Uprising || ✓ PDF Download by ✓ Robert Shogan
      119 Robert Shogan
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ The Battle of Blair Mountain: The Story of America's Largest Labor Uprising || ✓ PDF Download by ✓ Robert Shogan
      Posted by:Robert Shogan
      Published :2019-06-10T02:05:02+00:00

    About “Robert Shogan

    1. Robert Shogan says:

      Robert Shogan Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Battle of Blair Mountain: The Story of America's Largest Labor Uprising book, this is one of the most wanted Robert Shogan author readers around the world.



    2 thoughts on “The Battle of Blair Mountain: The Story of America's Largest Labor Uprising

    1. After reading Storming Heaven [see my review of that novel] and watching the movie Matewan, I wanted to read a dependable nonfiction account of those events, so that I'd know exactly what actually happened in real life, and verify for myself how closely the fictional versions reflect the truth (the answer to the latter question turns out to be, pretty closely!). Longtime serious journalist (a veteran Washington correspondent) and now Johns Hopkins Univ. academic Shogan provides that account. His [...]

    2. A year and a half of ambushes against cops and hired guns, a jury willing to acquit their fellow rabble despite evidence against them and one of the largest armed insurrections in US history - amazing. I wish Shogan had concentrated a little less on Hatfield and talked more from the perspective of the miners, but I did appreciate how they had a steady background vigilance of shoot-outs and dynamitings. I also thought it was interesting that a lot of the miners only did it as seasonal work, and s [...]

    3. After seeing a documentary about Blair Mtn, I was curious to read more. This book was difficult to sift through, but I was determined to do it. (My husband read it also and felt the same way.) It is the story of what was supposed to be America's largest labor uprising, set in the early 1900's in West Virginia. There were so many characters, and the time line kept switching, but the author included both economic and political background that led up to the actual event. After finally finishing the [...]

    4. It is easy to forget how hard fought labor's progress was in America. I love reading about the labor movement, though it is depressing when you consider how much those sacrifices have been reversed in the last several decades. Here's the author's summing up of Blair Mountain, the largest labor uprising in our country's history, which speaks to some of the unique limitations that labor in the U.S. seems to face:"In sum, both the aftermath of the miners' march in West Virginia and the auto workers [...]

    5. I wanted to learn more about this battle and especially about the significance of the federal and local government response to the insurrection - the largest since the Civil War - but for the general reader it is probably too focused on chronology and detail of the lead up to the battle. A separate conclusion chapter would have helped clarify the context and implications, I think. It's still an incredible event of history that should be more discussed in school, IMO.

    6. Pretty decent book. I would have liked to learn more, but I have a feeling that Shogan found as much of the story to tell as he could. Either way, a very important story in the history of Labor.

    7. A very interesting book on a very unknown part of US History. At the close of World War I, the UMW was attempting to extend their reach in the coal country of West Virginia, and many of the companies were attemping to prevent this.Overall, it's a well told account. If there is a flaw, it's that it is perhaps a bit uncritical of the decision of the miners to escalate to violence. Shogan is more than willing to critisize the Mine Owners and the Federal Government, but doesn't really dig into the i [...]

    8. I figured I ought to learn something about Labor, since we get the day off. But, man, this book just didn't hold my interest. Partially that might be because I put this book down to read a more immediate hold. But people argued for a while, lots of shots were fired, and rich people got richer. (Does that really need a spoiler tag?)It seemed like there might have been an interesting story here, but I wasn't drawn in or anything. It wasn't bad, but not very interesting to a casual reader such as m [...]

    9. In the early 1920s, West Virginia went to war with itself. The miners wanted to unionize; the mine-owners didn't. Given the owners hardball tactics and their alliance with the state's political powers, it's no surprising things turned ugly (though the miners certainly contributed to the bloodshed) with murders for profit and revenge, the blithe disregard of constitutional rights and law-enforcement frequently redhanded up to its elbows. Grim, but absorbing.

    10. What the hell is wrong with people?In other news I keep waffling between 3 and 4 stars for this one. Keep leaning towards 4 because this is the only book I could find on the subject and it had a shit-ton of information but the writing was clunky in places. There are also a lot of people to keep track of but a lot of you have gotten through the ASOIAF series already so that shouldn't be a problem.

    11. History we should all be aware of. Excellent story of a largely forgotten event in the history of labor/ capital relations. An army of "rednecks" in their red bandannas sought to stand up for themselves and demand justice for crimes committed by the mine owners' army of thugs was broken up when the US army intervened a forced them home. A fascinating read about power and (in) justice.

    12. I was reading this book during the Sago Mine disaster and I had to stop. What was going on tv was just too tragic. I enjoyed it up to that point, so perhaps I'll pick it up again soon.

    13. Definitely worth reading if you are at all interested in the history of the labor movement, West Virginia, the coal industry, Warren G. Harding, or post WWI America.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *